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Gear Guide Cookware Buying Guide, OutdoorPlaces.Com

 

 

 OutdoorPlaces.Com Cookware Buying Gear Guide

 

 Picking The Right Cookware

 
HANDLES

Bail Handles

Bail handles are almost identical to what you would find on a bucket.  The semi circle arch rises from two points on the side of your pot, and folds down to the side when stored.  Some bail handles have a notch at the center, allowing for easier hanging over a fire.  Bail handles can get hot, and if the handle is kept up while cooking, can become untouchable.  Bail handles that swing easily can dump your meal into your cooking source or fire if they get swinging.

Swing Handles

Swing handles are wires or a bar that swings out from the side of your pots and frying pans to form a handle.  The most basic mess kits have a swing handle the goes over the top lid holding the whole set together.  Because they are attached to the pot, and close to the heat source, they get very hot, even insulated ones can give you a nasty burn.  If you are using a bug or windshield while cooking, the swing handles can get in the way.  Sure you can swing them down to the sides but they will become unmanageably hot.  Swing handles can also make nesting your pots, well, interesting if you are in a hurry or you are wearing gloves.

Pot Grabber

A pot grabber is used for cookware that has no handles.  There are several benefits to using a pot grabber versus having a cooking set with handles.  Because the pot grabber is not attached, you can use bug and windscreens easily.  If you want to use your cookware in a camp oven, you donít have to worry about rubber coated swing handles melting from the heat.  A pot grabber doesnít get hot, simply use it to move the pot on and off the heat source.  Finally a well-designed pot grabber will hold a pot firm, even when full and gives you a nice stable grip for moving your meal around.